Tag Archives: Glenmorangie

The December Bottles, #1: Glenmorangie Signet

This year I decided to begin what will (I hope) become an annual tradition: opening a few extravagant bottles after Thanksgiving to enjoy. Throughout the year, various bottlings are discontinued, put on sale, or stumbled upon unexpectedly. As with most aficionados I have accumulated a pile of bottles “for a special occasion”. Instead of hoarding them, I’d like to make sure I have at least one spot on my calendar where I will definitely make a dent in them.

This year I have four bottles that I’ve opened. One was found at a great price, one I’d wanted for a while, one unexpected dusty find and one very new bottling. I’ll be revealing these over the next couple weeks with my thoughts on them.

First up is Glenmorangie Signet. I’ve been curious about this bottle for ages. It’s an incredibly classy presentation – a nice bottle that doesn’t resemble a still; nice type and design; a rich-looking fade from black on the bottle, and an unusual and borderline over-the-top metal ring treatment at the neck and stopper of the bottle. The stopper is probably the heaviest I’ve ever felt. It actually weighs nearly a quarter of a pound. I guess that’ll keep any angels from stealing beyond their share.

Nearly a quarter of a pound. That's a hefty stopper!

The Signet comes in a very oversized box, which contains the bottle – obviously – and a small flip book. The flip book is a curious addition; I can honestly say I’ve never seen a whisky package that includes one. Opposite the flip animation is a bit of marketing copy that is completely over the top. If you took it at face value, you’d probably believe that Signet is somewhere between germ theory and the wheel in terms of importance to humanity. The box lid itself inverts and becomes a presentation-style base for the whisky bottle. If it’s as amazing as the book would indicate, this is the least that can be done for such an important whisky.

Upon reading the Signet booklet, Dr. Louis Pasteur realized his life's work was less important than he'd thought.

All this is great: a very nice presentation. But what about the contents of this handsome package?

Glenmorangie Signet, as the story goes, is made using a large proportion of older whisky, as well as some younger whisky made with chocolate malted barley. The beer drinkers know what this means: the barley is roasted until it is deep in color. No actual chocolate was used in the production of this whisky, unless a distillery employee happened to be eating a bar of chocolate. (Remember, single malt Scotch whisky is always water and barley. Any more than that and their trade group gets a bit persnickety)

Thumbs up to Glenmorangie for finding a new way to innovate within the fairly restrictive parameters for single malts. Most other innovations have been largely in the direction of finishing in unusual barrels – which seems to be part of a marketing arms race versus a substantial improvement in aroma, taste or mouthfeel. Some experiments are a success but the vast majority are a push – and some an outright disaster. I’d be very curious to see what else could come of experimenting with malts as there’s a lot of room to experiment here.

Pouring the Signet into the glass and nosing, there’s an initial surprise. Despite its 46% ABV stated on the label, it’s got a surprisingly lively nose. There’s definitely a little heat on it. There’s a sweetness with some cherry notes, as well as some definite notes of sherry in there as well. Plums and dry fruit come in quickly after, with a bit of leather and some fig. The leather also has an old study character to it. The malty aspects of the nose do slightly hint in the direction of a stout; clearly the result of the chocolate malt. There’s also something that tastes like a mix of dark chocolate and espresso. It’s a multilayered nose but it works together. It screams “December” to me.

The palate doesn’t disappoint: It’s warm and rich, with heat and sherry. There’s a slightly bitter presence of oak. The mouthfeel is thick and rich with dried fruit. The chocolate malt comes through again, giving it a sweet, slightly bready characteristic with dark chocolate and espresso as well. The palate doesn’t surprise after the nose. The finish is drying with dark dried fruit. The wood is pretty apparent in the finish but it’s not a bitter presence. At the very end, some malty sweetness peeks out.

This whisky is a big, rich, full and easygoing whiskey. If I were to draw a parallel to anything on the market, my first instinct would be Macallan 18. I’d probably be willing to drink this as a replacement for Macallan 18 at any given time. It’s got a lot of the same notes and a similar character. Unfortunately, Signet retails for about $50 more than Macallan 18, so why bother if that’s the sole characteristic?

Overall it’s enjoyable in a not-very-challenging way (high marks for a holiday whisky or potentially something to serve to people who aren’t hardcore spirits dorks. It’s tasty but not particularly nuanced. I’d be curious to see what happens if more chocolate malt was in the mix – it might not work. Overall, it’s good but it needs something to punch it up.

Reflecting on this one in terms of a value for the money standpoint – one I admit I don’t do often – I can’t help but think that this would be dramatically cheaper if the packaging was a more common sleeve or tin and the presentation base and flip book were done away with. If this were price-competitive with Macallan 18, as mentioned above, I would seriously consider it as a substitute. As it is, it seems a bit overpriced for what it is. it’s a unique experiment and I certainly hope Glenmorangie tries more. However, given the packaging of Signet (and the over-the-top presentation of Pride), it seems that Glenmorangie’s most interesting experiments will be unfortunately sequestered to the glass case with a high price tag. In all fairness to Glenmorangie, I have heard the Pride is great (from a friend who tried some at a tasting) – but at $2500+ a bottle, I’ll never know.

At a glance

Glenmorangie Signet 46% ABV
Nose: 
An initial surprise with some stronger-than-expected alcohol notes. A sweetness on the nose with some cherry notes, some sherry characteristics, plums, dried fruit, a light leather-and-old-study note and some fig. There’s a malty presence that is a bit like a stout, no doubt owing to the use of chocolate malt. There’s a slight espresso-meets-chocolate note. After a bit there’s a more direct barley note. 
Palate: 
Warm and rich on the palate, with a very slight bitter oak to it, sherry notes present, surprising heat again. Thick in the mouth, dried fruit again. Slight bread, slight sweet notes of malt. Dark chocolate, a bit of espresso.
Finish: 
Drying and with dark, dried fruit. Wood pretty apparent but not bitter. A bit of malt sweetness peeking out at the end. 
Comment:  This is a big, full, easygoing whiskey. This would be one that I’d use as a “worthy replacement for Macallan 18″ but it’s about $50 more, so what’s the point? Enjoyable but not challenging, tasty but not particularly nuanced. I’d be curious to see what happens if there was a bit more chocolate malt in the mix. It’s good but needs something to punch it up.
Rating:
B

Gift Packs: Bargains Galore

A while back, I wrote about how useful a good glass can be for appreciating everything a whiskey has to offer. The right shape of glass will help focus some of the aromas that would otherwise blow past your earlobes and set on your forehead in a traditional old fashioned glass. My favorite, as I’d mentioned, was the Glencairn glass.

In the last few weeks of shopping, I’ve seen holiday gift sets starting to appear on shelves, and there’s been a number of them with Glencairn glasses. Better yet, the price is right. If you’ve been curious about these glasses but don’t want to pony up $10-12 for a single glass, then the holidays are your absolute best time to pick one up at a low cost.

One gift pack I saw is an Old Pulteney 12 Gift Pack (I saw the actual article at the Wine House recently). This pairs two Glencairn glasses with an Old Pulteney logo, as well as a bottle of the 12 year old Old Pulteney. It’s a great bargain: about $35 gets you the two glasses and a bottle of Old Pulteney. If you’ve never had Old Pulteney, it’s a great, low-risk way to try it – even if you don’t like the bottle, you will have two great glasses.

Another was a Glenfiddich gift set. It looks like the major stores will be selling an Americanized version with two old fashioned glasses. However, I have stumbled across a different version: a bottle of Glenfiddich 12, a Glenfiddich logo Glencairn, and a small “tasting diary”. The tasting diary looked like a pretty decent quality, small, moleskine-type notebook (but very very thin). At less than $25, you’re basically paying $12 for the whiskey – a great deal.

You might also find that some stores put out old stock they may have gotten at a low cost from distributors, or have had warehoused over the last year. I saw an Old Forester Prohibition Repeal set this week as well. This set couples an Old Forester logo Glencairn (their press release from the time calls it a “snifter” – fine) and a 375mL bottle of Old Forester in a prohibition-era style bottle. It also includes an Old Forester logo pen and a scroll of the 21st Amendment. “Suitable for framing”, no doubt. I can always use a pen. This gift set was released in 2008 and I found it on shelves at the end of 2011. Keep an eye out.

If you think the Glencairn is impossibly dorky and just for people who are too precious about the whole thing, you could be right. There are some decent quality old fashioned glasses to be had out there; and sometimes you want a cocktail (say… an old fashioned). My favorite example of these were the Four Roses Single Barrel gift set. A bottle of Four Roses Single Barrel (recipe unknown, at least on my bottle) and two old fashioned glasses of pretty good quality. Four Roses is a great bourbon. If they ever start putting recipes on the label, keep your eyes peeled for the OBSK recipe – it’s great. Most of the major bourbon producers seem to be going the route of old fashioned glasses, so it’s an easy pickup.

Beyond that, there are some great bargains to be had. I’ve seen Glenmorangies cropping up recently with samples of their finishing experiments (Astar, Lasanta, Quinta Ruban, Nectar D’or) bottled alongside a Glenmorangie Original. The usual Macallan 12 with samples of Macallan 18 tucked inside are also showing up. Given the entry fee of $140/bottle for the 18, it’s a great way to try it if you haven’t.

I’ve also seen Johnnie Walker Black packaged with a small flask as well as Jim Beam white label with a flask. If you don’t have one, this could be a good place to pick one up along with a good, accessible bottle for guests who may not share more esoteric tastes (or might simply want to mix with something).

Hopefully you can find something that kills two birds with one stone this season – and don’t forget to pick up a gift for a friend. It can be an unexpected gift that might kick off a passion – especially if they have someone to help show them the ropes.